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The Best Travel Problem Solutions To Get the Results You Want

A sign indicating where to go to give feedback

A travel problem can seriously disrupt a journey that should have been amazing. You are looking forward to a trip of a lifetime and instead are confronted with a travel problem that you now need to sort out. But how do you go about this?

Some travellers can find it uncomfortable to have to complain while others think nothing of voicing their annoyance. My advice is to give constructive feedback if you find you have a travel problem and below I give you examples of how to do this with confidence.

These examples are based on my own real-life travel experiences.

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Find Out Tips and Tricks to Solve These Common Travel Problems

  • You arrive at your hotel, enter your room and guess what, it is a sub-standard version of the hotel website’s photo.
  • You order your food, and it arrives, you taste it and guess what, it’s not good.
  • You’ve paid top-notch for a room with a sea view, you get there and find that a huge palm tree now hides the view?
  • You are a light sleeper and find your room next to the hotel lift in constant use until the early hours?

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How to A Solve Problem With Confidence

I am sure that you have many stories of things not going quite as expected during your travels. I could give you a list as long as my arm of things that haven’t come up to par for me whilst travelling, but the main thing is how do we put them right.

With some problems, such as adjoining building works, there is no solution. You could ask sweetly if they could stop construction while you enjoyed your stay, but the likelihood of that happening is less than winning the lottery. So what do you do?

Firstly, don’t get mad, don’t shout and don’t use expletives. I have witnessed all of this happening, and it just makes everyone irritate and then unwilling to help.

Do’s and Don’ts to Getting a Problem Solved

Do not start ranting and raving at the receptionists. It is not their fault that there is a problem, but if they can’t come up with an immediate solution, ask to speak directly with the manager. He or she is the person that makes the final decisions and needs to be aware of the problems that are occurring in the establishment.

Do have a clear idea of what you want to talk about with the manager, rather than rambling on about topics that aren’t relevant to your complaint and make sure that instead of using the words ” I want to complain” replace it with the words ” I would like to give you some feedback”  If they are a good manager they will welcome your input.

Don’t feel intimidated by anyone. Make it clear that you are unhappy with the service/room/food and that the standards are not as they should be.  Remember the adage of “the customer is always right.”

Have in your mind a solution that you would be happy to accept. Don’t have unrealistic expectations such as a full refund or a transfer to the penthouse suite. Be flexible and within reason as to your requirements.

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How to Solve A Travel Problem via Social Media 

Let the manager know that you want to establish a positive review on social media and that solving problems swiftly and professionally will renew your faith in the brand. Afterwards make sure that you mention on social media that a problem you had was dealt with quickly and efficiently, which enabled you to enjoy your trip to the full. A positive review could make the difference to a favourable decision being made by fellow travellers whether to use the establishment or service.

Remember, no-where can be completely perfect. I have stayed in some of the top hotels in the world and found fault. A good manager/establishment is one who can quickly rectify a travel problem to your satisfaction.

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Feedback and make a difference

Don’t ever suffer in silence. You have paid for a service, and you are in your right to receive it. Just don’t confuse a moan such as the television not tuning in to your favourite channel or the birds singing too early in the morning for a real complaint, such as the toilet not flushing or the food you have ordered being cold.  Choose what is important for you to “give feedback” about.

Don’t forget to give general feedback to an establishment as you check out. If you have had a great stay, then let them know what made it so good. If you would have liked something in your room that wasn’t available, then point it out. In the past, I have remarked that more clothes hangers would have been good or maybe swapping plastic straws to paper ones would help the environment.

Customer feedback is invaluable to hotels who want to ensure that their establishment performs to its highest ability.

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Turn negativity into positivity

I have always received positive reactions to my feedback. The manager of a luxury hotel in Egypt once told me he was pleased that I had taken the time to point out the problems. He was employing “secret hotel inspectors” to find faults, but it appeared they weren’t reporting back to him. If only I had known that was a job!!! Who wouldn’t love to inspect hotels and feedback to management the good, the bad and the ugly!

Rarely, something can’t be put right, and I list the solutions I received to my opening questions when I gave “feedback” to the management.

You enter your hotel room, and it is a sub-standard version of the photo on the hotel website.

What do you do?

I spoke to the manager of a luxury five-star hotel and discovered that the rooms on the website were in a block that had just been refurbished. I had been put in the “old” block where the shower door wouldn’t close, the curtains had moth holes in them, and there was a layer of dust over everything. He was unaware they were in such bad disrepair.

I pointed out that I had booked the room on the premise that it was the same as on the website, and therefore I wanted to be moved to a newly refurbished room. He was most understanding and not only moved me but also upgraded me to Club facilities. I would now be happy to give the hotel a favourable rating based on my new room and the manager’s conduct.

You order your food, and it arrives, you taste it and guess what, it’s not good.

What do you do?

This has happened so many times it is now laughable. You need to feedback to the manager the problem and the potential health hazards and ask for the bill to reflect that the dish has been removed.

I have had several managers insist that nothing is wrong and I should eat it. These are the ones that bring a bad name to the industry, but I calmly refuse to pay for the offending item, and it is eventually deducted from my bill.

You’ve paid top-notch for a room with a sea view. You get there and find that a huge palm tree now hides the view?

What do you do?

It’s quite obvious you can’t cut a tree down, but you can be given a different room. I informed the manager I had paid a premium for a sea-view, and all I could see was a tree. The hotel was still advertising the room with old photos of “what used to be there”.

I asked to be moved or for the difference between the sea-view room against a standard room to be refunded. He moved me to a higher room with the sea-view I had paid for, and I was happy. I also fed back to him that this would happen again if he weren’t more authentic with his advertising.

You are a light sleeper and find you are next to the hotel lift that is in constant use?

What do you do?

After an interrupted nights sleep due to noise from the lifts, I spoke to the manager and explained my situation. I requested to be moved as far away from the lift as possible. The only rooms left were smaller, but I was happy to make the swap.  I knew the silence I would receive the following night would far outweigh having a larger room.

Never forget every travel problem has a solution. Have you had a problem that you managed to solve?

Let me know in the comments section below.

Read Next: Can a staycation still be classed as travel?

About Author

Angela Price

Angie is a full-time travel writer with over 30 years of travel experience. She has always had a passion for travel, and after a 3-month world trip with her 18-year-old son, she created her popular travel blog to share her adventures with a wider audience. When Angie is at home in the UK, she enjoys exploring the English countryside, visiting castles and gardens and planning her next big adventure. Her motto is "Live Life Wandering not Wondering".

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chocoviv
1 year ago

I always look for the positives in every negative situation…it helps the business to improve too!

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